Weekly Photo Challenge: Depth

Another week and another challenge. Yesterday we spent some time in the National Park in search of snow. There’s no doubt we certainly found it including a “hairy moment” on the old road through Nant Ffrancon. More on that later. This weeks challenge was to portray depth in some way and so I’d like to start with a photograph from Llyn Padarn, taken yesterday from that famous viewing point on the stone bridge. Talking of that bridge it seemed like anyone who had a camera was there yesterday, including a coach load of tourists. As usual they were in a hurry to get “that photograph”. No thought for anyone else. Move over and let me take one….

Llyn Padarn

At the moment the water is really clear and you can see the stones in the lake bed easily.

Don’t look for “depth” but instead search for subject aspects which prove the presence of depth. – Andreas Feininger,

I mentioned a “hairy moment” earlier and here’s what happened. Rather than take the A5 from Bethesda to Llyn Ogwen I decide with my fellow photographers to take the old road that runs up the opposite side of Nant Ffrancon from the A5. All seemed well at first. Some snow, a little bit of ice, but easily navigable, especially with 4 wheel drive and as a bonus we came across some ponies grazing right at the side of the road.

Ponies

But back to that “hairy moment” Not much further up the road rises quite steeply. Seemed OK but suddenly we were slipping. Instead of driving in snow we were now in pure ice and it was not going good.

Icy Road

To cut a long story short we did manage to make it back down, thanks to my fellow photographers guiding me until I could find a safe turning point.

That’s it for this week. I hope you enjoyed the photographs.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Express Yourself

..As a boy in school, my twin subject areas of strongest interest were Mathematics and Art. Photography combines the two so I feel I’ve really landed on my feet. I originally wanted to be a painter – I seemed to be good in that medium, but I didn’t see myself surviving in England. I felt that I needed a way to make a living and photography is an ideal vehicle for both survival and personal expression. – Michael Kenna

Now I was never that great at Mathematics in school, or Art for that matter. But in later years I came to be quite proficient in Mathematics at least. I see my photography today as Art. Photographing the rugged landscapes in the Snowdonia National Park and our North Wales coast is my way of expressing myself.

The Tree

This tree on the edge of Llyn y Dywarchen has always intrigued me. How did it end up there? Maybe it was planted for a reason but look at the surrounding landscape. But I think I know why it’s there. As you follow the wall towards the tree there are the remains of an abandoned stone house. Perhaps the owner of the house planted it? Interestingly enough, if you walk further around the lake you will find another abandoned house. It’s got a tree also, well a couple to be precise.

This Old House

A week or so ago I was on the coast waiting for the sun to set. But I’d got the tide times wrong. The tide was on the way in and I knew I was never going to see that setting sun. At least not from the spot I was currently standing on. Time to move before I get my feet wet…and it’s not the first time that’s happened. I broke the golden rule. Forgot to look behind me. Last summer I was so busy concentrating on getting the sunset I didn’t spot the tide creeping in behind my back. Fortunately I spotted it in time and had to paddle through a small puddle to a drier part of the beach. has that ever happened to you? Frightening at first. My first thought was had the stretch of water turned the sand into quicksand, I must admit I was glad to be carrying my tripod that day.

52 in 2015 Week 3 Silhouette

Here in North Wales I think as photographers we are extremely lucky. The National Park is easily accessible, as is our coastline. We get some amazing sunsets throughout the year, even in wintertime. What more could we ask for?

Talacre Sunset

Snow can sometimes be found on the mountains, transforming the landscape, making everything look brighter and enabling us to photograph “something different”

Cwm Idwal

I think you can see from this series of photographs that I enjoy getting out, photographing our wonderful landscapes. Am I expressing myself? I hope you think I am….

Extra, Extra

This week I’ve been in the southern part of the Snowdonia National Park using Harlech as my base for exploring and trying out the Olympus OM-D E-M1 for landscape photography using the 12-40mm f2.8 lens. So there I am stopped in a layby, with hills either side of me, shooting down the valley when something extremely low and fast pops up from the valley below.

Typhoon

It came so fast I only had time to shoot off two photographs of this Typhoon as it shot over the top of me. Where had it come from? Where was it going to? Now I should have known better. I was so intent on testing the camera that I’d forgotten about the Mach Loop, a set of valleys, near to the towns of Dolgellau and Machynlleth, used regularly by military aircraft to practice low-flying.

I’d been meaning to visit the Mach Loop for some time but never got round to doing it…and here I was with no telephoto lens to get a closer picture. Isn’t it always the way with photography?